We promise we’re not going to make this whole issue a love letter to Arthur Erickson. But his work so succinctly demonstrates just what’s special about West Coast Modernism: a connection to this beautiful, wild place. Case in point (if you’ll bear with us for just one more swoon): the Eppich House, a terraced masterpiece that slinks down the West Vancouver landscape (as much as concrete can slink, anyway) to open up sprawling views of artfully positioned reflecting ponds and a verdant garden. Originally built in 1972, it enjoyed a respectful rehabilitation in 2017—gracefully executed by BattersbyHowat—which was featured in these pages. While the inhabitants and furniture (and rainscreen technology) may have changed, it remains, and always will remain, an ode to where we are.

eppich house
Credit: Dick Busher/Arthur Erickson Foundation

Arthur Erickson’s Eppich House was built in 1972 for Helmut and Hildegard Eppich.

eppich house
Credit: Martin Tessler/Western Living 2017

“We were excited to be doing this, but we also knew that all eyes would be on us,” said architect David Battersby of BattersbyHowat in our July 2017 issue, “seeing what we’d done and not done.”

eppich house
Credit: Martin Tessler/Western Living July 2017
eppich house
Credit: Martin Tessler/Western Living July 2017
eppich house
Credit: Martin Tessler/Western Living July 2017

To read about more great people, designs, homes and innovations that shaped Western Living, click here.